Lesson #2: Let them eat brioche

 

How does one describe bread made with butter and eggs?
One mistakes it for a cake.
If you happen to be a French philosopher called
Rousseau, you crave it with wine                                                                                                and
write all about it in your autobiography.

Revolutionaries read Confessions (1769), and presume the “great princess”—who advises those who have no bread to instead eat brioche—to be the last Queen of France.

The hairdresser of Marie-Antoinette powders her extravagant bouffant with wheat flour.
The flour is supposed to add volume to the hair, in the same way proofing the dough makes it more capacious before baking it.
            The people of Paris are starving.                                                                                            An
uprising known as “The Flour War” begins.

            I make a Croque Monsieur out of brioche. I do not treat it like a cake.

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